Shingle Oak

Quercus imbricaria

Description:


The shingle oak is a distinct species with narrow, smooth-edged leaves with no lobes. Bark is similar to several other red oak species; leaves are the best method to ID this tree.

Distribution:


Central eastern US, extending from eastern Kansas to southern Michigan to North Carolina. The distribution is spotty around the outer edges of its range.


Distribution Map

Habitat:


Moist upland soils and bottomlands, well-drained soil, not usually in swamps.

Leaf:


Oval, 3-8" long, usually with no lobes. Resembles a laurel leaf. Sun leaves are often wavy.

Shingle Oak

Bark:


Gray to dark gray, furrowed, often with flat ridges. Occasionally may have a more blocky appearance, especially on lower trunk.

Shingle Oak

Acorn:


Small, 1/2" to 3/4" with shallow caps that cover about 1/3 of the nut. Dark in color when ripe.

Gallery

Look-alike oaks:


Willow Oak - Leaves of both species have no lobes, but those of shingle oak are larger and broader, and acorns are larger.


Laurel Oak - Similar leaf shape, but laurel oak is a small tree of the deep south, where shingle oak is nearly absent.

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